Ultimate Guide to The best california camp sites

When you go camping, you need a place to sleep. But what kind of tent should you get? Do you want something that is easy to set up or something that is more comfortable?

To make things easier for you, we’re here to help. We’ve compiled a list of the best tents available, so you can find the perfect one for your next camping trip.

Whether you’re looking for something large and spacious, or something lightweight and easy to transport, we’ve covered different tent brands like Menasha Ridge Press, KEEN Utility, Magpul, EASTWOOD,CLINT, Moon Travel in this article.

So get ready to explore some of the best tents on the market today!

Rockhounding California: A Guide to the State

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Best Tent Camping: Texas: Your Car-Camping Gu

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Best Tent Camping: Southern California: Your

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KEEN Utility womens Flint 2 Mid Steel Toe Wat

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  • STEEL TOE: Left and right asymmetrical steel toe design provides a roomier toe box for maximum comfort and an unobtrusive fit; The Flint Mid Steel Toe work boots meet or exceed ASTM F2412 and F2413 /75 C/75 EH standards
  • WATERPROOF: KEEN.DRY is a waterproof, breathable membrane liner that lets vapor out without letting water in for keeping your feet dry and comfortable; These work boots have a mesh liner that integrates with the waterproof membrane
  • FIT & CONSTRUCTION: Built on a specific women’s foot form that is wider than the industry norm for improved fit & comfort; The sizes listed are women’s and fit true to size; Made with reflective webbing for additional safety and visibility
  • TRACTION: Oil- and slip-resistant, non-marking, rubber outsoles are used for improved traction that meet or exceed ASTM F1677 MARK II and ASTM F2913 SATRA Non-Slip Testing Standards; Lugged tread outsoles wider channels help provide superior traction
  • SUPPORT & COMFORT: Made with KEEN.ReGEN a lightweight, compression-resisting midsole providing 50% more energy return than standard EVA foam for lasting support and comfort; CleansportNXT provides natural odor protection using probiotic

Magpul Industries MBUS Generation II Sight Se

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  • Impact resistant polymer construction provides light weight and resists operational abuse
  • Spring-loaded flip up sight easily activated from either side or by pressing the top
  • Detent and spring pressure keeps sight erect but allows for unobstructed folding under impact, etc.
  • Clamps to any MIL-STD-1913 Picatinny/STANAG 4694 receiver rail and provides the same height-over-bor
  • NOT FOR RAILED GAS BLOCKS

Best Tent Camping: Wisconsin: Your Car-Campin

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Paint Your Wagon

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Moon California Camping: The Complete Guide t

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Indiana Bucket List Adventure Guide: Explore

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Moon West Coast RV Camping: The Complete Guid

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California camp sites buying guide

California camp sites Buying guide

When you’re looking for a new tent, there are a lot of factors to take into consideration. How big do you need it to be? What sort of features do you want? This section will help you answer these questions.

Size

While on a recent camping trip, I found out the hard way that tents come in all shapes and sizes. When choosing a tent, it’s important to consider how much space you’ll need. After all, there’s nothing worse than being cramped up in a small tent with all your gear.

If you have a lot of gear, or if you just like to have a lot of space while camping, then you should look for a large tent. On the other hand, if you’re short on space or if you’re planning on camping in a more remote area, then you can get away with a smaller tent.

No matter what size tent you choose, make sure it’s big enough to comfortably fit you and all your gear.

Durability

When you buy a tent, you’re not just buying something to keep the rain off your head for one weekend- you’re buying something that will hopefully last for many years of camping adventures. That’s why it’s important to consider durability when making your purchase.

A cheap tent might seem like a good deal at first, but it won’t hold up to repeated use and will need to be replaced much sooner than a higher quality tent.

In the long run, spending a bit more on a durable tent will save you money and hassle. Look for tents made from tough, waterproof materials like ripstop nylon or polyester.

These fabrics will stand up to wind and rain, and won’t tear easily if you brush up against a tree branch or sharp rock. A good Tent also has strong seams that are taped or sealed to prevent water from leaking in, and YKK zippers that won’t get stuck or break after extended use.

Price

You might be tempted to save a few bucks by going for the cheapest option, but trust me – it’s not worth it. Cheap tents are usually made from lower-quality materials, which means they won’t last as long.

They’re also more likely to leak, tear, or otherwise fall apart at the first sign of bad weather. So if you’re looking for a tent that will give you years of hassle-free use, be prepared to pay a little bit more upfront. It’ll be worth it in the long run.

Waterproof

While you might be able to get away with a non-waterproof tent in some scenarios, there are plenty of reasons why you should always opt for a waterproof option. For one thing, you never know when the weather is going to take a turn for the worse.

Even if the forecast is calling for clear skies, a sudden downpour can leave you (and your gear) drenched.

And even if the rain holds off, morning dew can still condense on the inside of your tent, leaving everything wet. Besides, a waterproof tent is also more versatile; it can serve as an impromptu shelter from the sun or wind, and it can even be used for fording rivers or crossing snowfields. In short, there’s simply no downside to investing in a waterproof tent.